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Final review_ “proof of concept” Pixelated lighthouse

PIXELATED LIGHTHOUSE

The height of the Piraeus Tower is unique within the Athenian landscape and offers particular opportunities which, thus far, have not been realized. The Piraeus tower is divided into three parts: The base extends to the plot lines and maintains the contextual streetedge. The next 7 floors correspond to the predominant height of the surrounding buildings. The last 11 floors are visible from many distant vantage points and have  the potential to produce a strong iconic image for the tower and Piraeus.

With this in mind, the Pixilated Lighthouse brings these three parts together in one cohesive composition. Base + Adjacency + Icon =
Pixilated Lighthouse.

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The aim of this proposal is to significantly affect the aspect of the Piraeus tower with a small effort. The means by which this is accomplished is a reflective facade. Considering the influence that the tower has on its environment, it is essential to integrate the Piraeus Tower with its surroundings. Pixelated Lighthouse is a direct response to the reading of the tower and its immediate site. Reflection is a robust strategy that can: humanize the tower at a close point of view, dissolve the tower’s mass at the middle point of view and generate a symbol from far away.

From a “close” point of view: The windows reflect the city and the building onto the surroundings. The upper portions that are not related to the context seem diminished due to the reflection. Dialogue to the city.

From a “middle” point of view: The windows disintegrate the height of the building. The reflection of the sky and the water makes an analogy to the wider context. Dialogue to the environment.

From “far” away: The pixilated windows reflect light. The distortion and its effects create a signifying object that becomes a landmark. The “Pixilated lighthouse” Piraeus tower.

To control those different configurations, a parametric code is written. This code takes in considerations the context, the size, the views and the height of the building.

To permit reflection at different angles the glass can be rotated on two axes. Four conditions exist with this system. 1) Planar: the windows are flush and operable. This condition exists on the overall facade depending on the need of ventilation. 2) Rotation on X axis: Reflection of the sky or the ground in verticality. 3) Rotation on the Z axis: produces reflections that are not perpendicular to the facade. 4) The rotation is applied on both axes: This configuration addresses a specific object from a certain point of view and thus produces a contextualizing effect that does not occur on the existing facade.

The Pixilated lighthouse proposal keeps the rhythm and the size of the existing structure and uses it to define the size of the glazing. The windows then are rotated on different angles allowing to reflect the surrounding on it.

PROOF OF CONCEPT

Elaboration of the “proof of concept”

The final mock-up size is about 1.3 by 1.4 m and is maid out of aluminum of 2.2mm. To allow reflection I simply use some plexi glass with a black background. No glue or additional elements is necessary.

It is constructed with two main point of reflection and one point of view. the idea is that if you stand at 3 m from the model you could see 12 times one object and 16 times an other one. The rest of the rotation “noise” is control by an image mapper in grasshopper.

Progress Pin-up_Defining the point of view

Here is the research on the different parameters that the grasshopper definition takes in consideration. It shows the range of possibilities and the deformation that the images produce.

Animation question

Hey everyone, can anyone give me a good program that can handle 100 images and make an animation out of it? I’ve tried to find some gif program but couldn’t find one which works fine…

Thanks for your answer!

Pixelated Lighthouse_GHX definition

GHX definition:

Here is a summery of the Gh definition. The 4 facade are made in the same definition and the color are related to the context. The red is for the south and the dark pink for the north. The grasshopper definition works with the Rhino file that I uploaded on this blogpost.

Basically the glazing reacts at two inputs by rotation: the first one, is made by an image mapper which rotate the windows on two axis, vertical and horizontal. The second one is by defining reflection on specific points of view. Then, a sort of feedback between both system is applied.

Closer look at the SOUTH facade:

7 main steps:

1_size of the overall/  2_dividing the base geometry/   3_defining the axis of rotation

4_convert number to image mapper/  5_rotation by  I.M. / 6_rotation by normal plane

7_feedback image mapper-normal plane

In the last part, a small VB.net code is written  (shawnabeT) to control the number of panels which are controlled either by the point of view feedback or by the image mapper. The percentage can be evaluated depending of the difference between the two panels. The result is an overall image from far away and a specific reflection from a middle point of view.

South and west facade       .

The 3 last diagrams show the points that affects the geometry. The squares are the elements that will be reflected on the facade and the spheres are the point of view where the effect will be visible.

Grasshopper file: download

Rhino file: download

feedback WIP

The rotation on the two axis made by the image mapper  is evaluated by an other system: the point of views and the object which is reflected. The definition then select all the glazing which are close enough to the previous rotation and define it as the new glazing.

Grasshopper definition: click here

Research on effects and inspirations

Daniel Rozen: Wooden mirror

Playing with the brighness of the material depending of the exposition to the light.

Daniel Rozin

Wooden mirror Video

Anish Kapoor Reflection work

C-Curve – Anish Kapoor – Corner Contraflow from Dominic Alves on Vimeo.

Deformation of the reflection.

ID-LAB Interactive Mirror

Interactive mirror

Interactive facade

Interactive facade at interactive architecture.org

Marilena Skavara – Adaptive Fa[ca]de

The video is really inspiring for the effect i want to create: click here



Response “Pixelated lighthouse”

The response is mainly focused on the 4 scales that adresses this project: far, middle, close and nearby. How do we percieve the reflection from those 4 points of view? What is the role for each one? Is there a way to approche the building enough to touch it? Is there some elements that can rotate? Those questions need to be clarified and developed taking in consideration the context, the views, the virtual spaces and the sun for glaring.

Mid-term Review “Pixelated Lighthouse”

Pixilated lighthouse

The height of the Piraeus Tower is unique within the Athenian landscape and offers particular opportunities which, thus far, have not been realized.
The Piraeus tower is divided into three parts:
The base extends to the plot lines and maintains the contextual street edge / The next 7 floors correspond to the predominant height of the surrounding buildings. / The last 11 floors are visible from many distant vantage points and have the potential to produce a strong iconic image for the tower and Piraeus.
With this in mind, the Pixilated Lighthouse brings these three parts together in one cohesive composition. Base + Adjacency + Icon = Pixilated Lighthouse.
The aim of this proposal is to significantly affect the aspect of the Piraeus tower with a small effort. The means by which this is accomplished is a reflective facade. Considering the influence that the tower has on its environment, it is essential to integrate the Piraeus Tower with its surroundings.

Design Strategies

Concept

Pixelated Lighthouse is a direct response to the reading of the tower and its immediate site. Reflection is a robust strategy that can: humanize the tower at a close point of view, dissolve the tower’s mass at
the middle point of view and generate a symbol from far away. To control those different configurations, a parametric code is written in Grasshopper (click here). This code takes in considerations the context, the size, the views and  the height of the building.

From a “close” point of view: The windows reflect the city and the building onto the surroundings. The upper portions that are not related to the context seem diminished due to the reflection. Dialogue to the city. From a “middle” point of view: The windows disintegrate the height of the building. The reflection of the sky and the water makes an analogy to the wider context. Dialogue to the environment. From “far” away: The pixilated windows reflect light. The distortion and its effects create a signifying object that becomes a landmark. The “Pixilated lighthouse” Piraeus tower.
To permit reflection at different angles the glass can be rotated on two axes. Four conditions exist with this system. 1) Planar: the windows are flush and operable. This condition exists on the overall facade depending on the need of ventilation. 2) Rotation on X axis: Reflection of the sky or the ground in verticality. 3) Rotation on the Z axis: produces reflections that are not perpendicular to the facade. 4) The rotation is applied on both axes: This configuration addresses a specific object from a certain point of view and thus produces a contextualizing effect that does not occur on the existing facade. The Pixilated lighthouse proposal keeps the rhythm and the size of the existing structure and uses it to define the size of the glazing. The windows then are rotated on different angles allowing to reflect the surrounding on it.

Overall layout:

Source

Here is the blog, “hyperbody“, of the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology. The blog  is definitly a good source of inspiration…